Garden design | Garden Decoration,Garden Decor Ideas

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Basil, thyme, rosemary, cinnamon! Lovely plants aren’t they? Lush green and look excellent when kept in potted plants. And so useful! Just imagine…you’re cooking and suddenly you run out of curry leaves. Instead of running to the nearest grocery shop, just hop into your own herb garden and pluck out a few leaves and there you go! A lifetime’s supply of taste-giving, medicinal herbs and oxygen too! The pride of your yard indeed. Everyone is looking for the perfect herb garden design plans!

Of course, growing a wide array of such herbs, native of their own climates and soil compositions is not going to be easy. Each herb is used to its own ecosystem and creating herb garden designs in one-size-fits-all is not very easy. So how to layout a herb garden?

Herb Garden Design Plans

The Preliminaries
Firstly, you have to decide which herbs you want in your garden.

Herbs are plenty and will vary with your needs. For example, if you have a particular chronic health problem, it will make sense to grow a herb that will help alleviate the illness. Similarly, it is no good growing parsley if you are not going to use it in any of your dishes! So first decide on the use and utility of each herb that you’re planning to grow. Also consider your local climatic conditions. Herbs are pretty delicate plants so plant them only if you think that the necessary weather conditions are suitable for them.

Herb Garden Designs
You can choose one or a combination of the below given herb garden design plans based on the herbs you are planning to plant. Each of these types has its own advantages and disadvantages. So try to maximize the advantages based on the herbs you use:

Container Planting
Simply put, container plantings are herb garden design plans where you are growing herbs in pots. The easiest way to do this is to club together all the herbs that need similar soils and sun exposure. Conversely, you could also pot each herb into individual small pots. I prefer the latter idea as it avoids the possibility of overcrowding. Most folks make the mistake of planting herbs too close to each other. This will create a competition between the herbs for space and the weaker ones will get a beating. So while making your herb garden design plans, make sure that the plants are well spaced out.

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rgodke

Rick Godke is a lifelong gardener since age 8. He studied agriculture and taught high school horticulture. He spent almost 20 years working as a County Extension Agent in three states where he educated farmers, home owners, and youth in the areas of production agriculture and home horticulture. Godke has trained adult Master Gardeners and school-age 4-H members in every aspect of gardening, as well as establishing community gardens. He has introduced two daylily varieties with the American Hermerocallis Society and has served as a national certified national daylily exhibition judge. https://plus.google.com/104974890596183747499?rel=author

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